Volume 2, Number 2, of Justice, Power and Resistance, the Journal of the European Group for the Study of Deviance and Social Control will be published in August 2018.

Subscriptions

Justice, Power and Resistance makes all content electronically available on an open access basis approximately 6 months after publication.  For this edition we have made activist contributions available, open access, on publication with articles and reviews to be made available here no later than the end of January 2019.

Contents

Minorities, Crime and (In)Justice

Monish Bhatia and Patrick Williams "Introduction: Minorities, Crime and (In) Justice"

Articles

Keir Irwin-Rogers "Racism and racial discrimination in the criminal justice system: Exploring the experiences and views of men serving sentences of imprisonment"

Agnieszka Martynowicz "Power, pain, adaptations and resistance in a ‘foreign’ prison: The case of Polish prisoners incarcerated in Northern Ireland"

Jonathan Burnett "In the teeth of the machine: workfare, immigration enforcement and the regulation of ‘surplus labour’"

Anya Edmond-Pettitt "Territorial Policing and the ‘hostile environment’ in Calais: from policy to practice"

Martin Joormann "Asylstaffetten – A longitudinal ethnographic study of protest walks against the detention of asylum seekers in Sweden"

Mostafa Gamal and Dalene M Swanson "Alterities of global citizenship: education, human rights, and everyday bordering."

Boris Bertolt "Can we start the debate? Homosexuality and Coloniality of gender in Africa"

Voices of activists and people embroiled within state institutions:

Kate Alexander  "'You have to isolate yourself from everything that makes you human to survive': immigration detention in Scotland"

Jessica Potter "Docs Not Cops, Medact Refugee Solidarity Group: Patients Not Passports – No Borders in the NHS!"

Becky Clarke "Disrupting the ‘Gang’"

Reviews

Joseph Dole  ‘Crook County: Racism and Injustice in America’s Largest Criminal Court’ by Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve

J.M. Moore Race and the Undeserving poor: From Abolition to Brexit’ by Robbie Shilliam